Blog

Message from the President - January 2014

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19 January 2014
Dear SAHSA Members,
Greetings from North Texas!   I am very pleased to be serving as President for the Society for Advancing the History of South Asia in 2014.   The current leadership of SAHSA has shifted over the last year, from New York State and Indiana to Texas and Illinois:  I am delighted to be joined by John Pincince of Loyola University Chicago, who is currently serving as Vice-President and will be SAHSA’s President for 2015.   John and I are indebted to all the hard work of the past to get SAHSA off the ground, and are particularly thankful for the mentorship of Past-Presidents Anne Hardgrove, Michael Dodson, and Lisa Trivedi, as well as Mrinalini Sinha, who have all offered guidance and institutional memory as we pick up the reins.   But we have not left the north and east completely behind:  We are joined by Faisal Chaudhry of the University of Pennsylvania, who has resumed the position of Secretary-Treasurer for 2014. 
           
This past AHA in Washington, D.C. was a great success for getting South Asia on the AHA Program.  SAHSA’s Annual Business Meeting, Drinks Reception, and SAHSA-CAH (Conference on Asian History) luncheon were all well-attended.   SAHSA sponsored/co-sponsored nine panels about South Asian history, in addition to the second annual John Richard Book Prize discussion, where we discussed the second John Richards prize-winning book, Douglas Haynes’ Small Town Capitalism in Western India: Artisans, Merchants and the Making of the Informal Economy, 1870-1960 (Cambridge, 2012). 
For AHA 2015 in New York City, we are planning a SAHSA panel to discuss A. Azfar Moin’s The Millennial Sovereign: Sacred Kingship and Sainthood in Islam (Columbia, 2012), which was awarded the John Richards Prize for 2013.   Congratulations to Azfar for his well-deserved prize!    In addition, along with the SAHSA business meeting at AHA, John and I hope to host a reception for SAHSA members and friends.  Last year we had a hotel suite and we are looking into some off-site locations. 
 
In order to help keep the South Asia history momentum rolling forward, we encourage members to propose a panel for the 2015 program, due Feb. 15th, 2014.   AHA offers a variety of formats and welcomes new kinds of sessions into the mix.  In particular, the AHA welcomes comparative panels and topics with broad appeal to the largest audience possible.   Below you will see details about AHA submissions along with strategies for submissions.
To sustain the activities we have planned for 2015, we have discussed instituting a modest membership fee. While we understand that many members will already be paying several fees for professional association memberships, we will have to rely on your support once more in the months to come. Please expect another communication about this later in the spring. Second, we will design and execute a new iteration of our website, to be hosted at H-NET. Third, we will complete our registration as a not-for-profit organization.
Our first priority includes encouraging all South Asianists to submit proposals for the 2015 AHA meeting. After the Feb. 15th deadline, we will work toward updating our membership database, website, and fee structure. Please stay tuned for emails about all those topics.
 
Please do not hesitate to get in touch with us to share your ideas, suggestions, and concerns of how SAHSA can serve our needs in the profession.   We’re really happy to be part of such a useful and important group.
 
Warm regards,
 
Neilesh Bose, President 2014,  neilesh.bose@unt.edu
John Pincince, Vice-President and President Elect (2014-15) jpincince@luc.edu
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/september-2013/call-for-proposals-for-the-129th-annual-meeting-of-the-aha
The 129th annual meeting of the American Historical Association will be held on January 2–5, 2015, in New York City. The Program Committee welcomes proposals from all members of the Association, whatever their institutional affiliation or status, as well as from affiliated societies, historians working outside the United States, and scholars in related disciplines. The theme for the meeting, described in greater detail on the following pages, is "History and the Other Disciplines." While seeking proposals for sessions that explore facets of this broad theme, we also welcome submissions on the histories of all places and periods, on many different topics, on the uses of varied sources and methods, and on theory and the uses of history itself. We also invite members to employ and analyze diverse strategies for representing the past, including fiction, poetry, film, music, and art. The AHA is a capacious organization, unique among learned societies in its devotion to the full range of historical scholarship and practice. We hope that our program will reflect this strength, and to this end, we will seriously consider any proposal that advances the study, teaching, and public presentation of history.
The 2015 annual meeting will also continue the discussions, launched at the 2012 meeting in Chicago, of the ways that historical practice is changing as a result of the ongoing digital revolution. We thus invite proposals on what it means to practice history in this digital age, and what new technologies imply for how we do research, how we present our findings, and how we interact with a variety of current and potential audiences. We welcome proposals that focus not only on cutting-edge "digital history," but also on the broad implications of digital technologies for all historical practitioners.
We invite proposals for sessions in four different formats: formal sessions (paper presentations plus comment), practicums, roundtable discussions, and thematic workshops. Individuals or small groups may also propose the presentation of posters as part of a poster session, to be held on Saturday afternoon, in which historians will share their research through visual materials. Finally, members are encouraged to propose experimental sessions (see Debbie Ann Doyle's article) using creative forms of presentation not covered by these standard session types. Please consider choosing a session format that will most effectively achieve your intellectual goals, and will best foster lively interaction among presenters and between presenters and the audience. We also offer 90-minute sessions as well as the usual two-hour slots. To assure substantial time for interaction between speakers and audience, all panels, regardless of format, are limited to a maximum of five participants serving as speakers or commentators; 90-minute sessions should have fewer speakers.
Please consult the "Annual Meeting Guidelines" when preparing your proposal. Note that the Association encourages the representation of the full diversity of its membership in the annual meeting. Successful sessions will reflect, to the extent possible, institutional and career stage diversity as well as gender and ethnic diversity. Proposals for panels that do not include such diversity may need to be revised and resubmitted. Please note also that proposals for individual presentations can be submitted only as posters; single paper proposals will not be considered for any other type of session (see guideline 4.2.E.).
Proposals must be submitted electronically. Full instructions for doing so can be found at "Instructions for Submitting Proposals." With the exception of foreign scholars and scholars from other disciplines, all persons appearing on the program must be members of the AHA. Proposals must be submitted in their completed form (that is, with full information concerning all participants and their presentations) by midnight, Pacific Standard Time, on February 15, 2014. Proposals cannot be submitted after the deadline has passed; the system will be closed to submissions and will not accept them.
Questions about the content of proposals should be directed to the Program Committee co-chairs Francesca Trivellato and Andrew Sartori. Questions about policies, modes of presentation, and the electronic submissions process should be directed to the 2015 Program Committee.
—Jan E. Goldstein (Univ. of Chicago) is the president-elect of the AHA; she will be presiding over the 129th annual meeting. Francesca Trivellato (Yale Univ.) is the chair and Andrew S. Sartori (New York Univ.) is the co-chair of the 2015 Program Committee.
 

SAHSA at the 2014 AHA

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Society for Advancing the History Of South Asia                  AHA 2014
 
AHA Session 21:
Political Violence as Anti--‐Colonial Critique: Algeria, India, Kenya
Thursday, January 2, 2014: 1:00 PM-3:00 PM Washington Room 5 (Marriott Wardman Park) Exhibition Level, Exhibit Hall B North
Chair/Discussant: Durba Ghosh, Cornell University
Physical and Symbolic Violence and the Colonization of Algeria Benjamin Claude Bower, University of Texas at Austin
“Action” & Interpretation: Political Violence, Terrorism, & Revolution in Interwar India Kama Maclean, New South Wales

Citizenship, Sovereignty, and Violence in Late Colonial Kenya Caroline M. Elkins, Harvard University

 
AHA Session33:
Famine In Continental Asia: Comparative Perspectives on Environment, Market,
State, and Society, 1700–1950
Thursday, Jan 2, 2014: 3:30 PM-5:30 PM Thurgood Marshall Ballroom South (Marriott Wardman Park)
Mezzanine Level
Yaron Ayalon, Ball State University                    Sarah I. Cameron, University of Maryland at College Park
Ranin Kazemi, Kansas State University                                                   Lillian M. Li, Swarthmore College
Mridu Rai, Trinity College at Dublin
___________________________________________________________________
AHA Session40:
Radical and Revolutionary Thought In British India: Rewriting India’s Twentieth--‐Century Intellectual History
Thursday, January 2, 2014: 3:30 PM-5:30 PM Columbia Hall 3 (Washington Hilton) – Terrace Level
Chair: Kama Maclean, University of New South Wales
Revolutionary Visions in British India: Bismil and Bhagat Singh, 1924–31 Aparna Vaidik, Georgetown
Political Aesthetics and Progressive Writers, 1940s–60s Maia A. Ramnath, UC Santa Cruz
Radical Visions of India’s Past: Poetics of Maratha National History Janaki Bakhle, UC Berkeley
Comment: Vinayak Chaturvedi, University of California, Irvine
___________________________________________________________________
AHA Session 97:
Using Petitions as a Source for South Asian History
Friday, January 3, 2014: 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Columbia Hall 7 (Washington Hilton)
Terrace Level:
Chair/Discussant: Bhavani Raman, Princeton University
Indian Petitions as a Literature of Complaint in Early Colonial Bengal Robert Travers, Cornell U
Election Petitions and the Meaning of the People’s Sovereignty David P. Gilmartin, NC State Univ.
Cows and Constitutionalism: Writ Petitions in the Indian Republic Rohit De, University of Cambridge
 
Conference on Asian History Luncheon (may pre-register at AHA registration)
Friday, January 3, 2014: 12:15 PM-1:45 PM Wilson Room B (Marriott Wardman Park)
Mezzanine Level – Wilson Foyer
Presiding: Stefan Tanaka, University of California, San Diego
Speaker: Thomas S. Mullaney, Stanford University
Waiting for Cadmus: Chinese Script in the Age of Alphanumeric Hegemony, 1871–Present
_____________________
AHA Session 118:
Place, Personhood, and Ethnicity in Military Service of South Asia, 1650–1900
Friday, January 3, 2014: 2:30 PM-4:30 PM Columbia Hall 11 (Washington Hilton) ---
Terrace Level
Chair: Terenjit Sevea, University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia
Retaking the Frontier: Ethnicity, Military, and Space in the NE & NW, 1850–1900 Catherine Warner, UW Seattle
Heterogeneous Military Labor Market and the Making of the Gorkhali Empire in the Himalayas
Sanjog Rupakheti, Loyola U New Orleans
Between Imperial Bookends: An Inquiry into the Histories of Afghan Princely States Naveena Naqvi, UCLA
The Horse, Conspicuous Consumption, and Embodied Masculinity in Persianate South Asia, 1650–1800
Monica Meadows, UW Seattle
___________________________________________________________________
Prescribed Modernities: Debates On Violence, Gendered Bodies,and Secularism
Friday, January 3, 2014: 2:30 PM-4:30 PM Calvert Room (Omni Shoreham) Lobby Level
Chair: Anne Hardgrove, University of Texas at San Antonio
Engendering War and Violence in 1971: Memories as Records of an Alternative History of the Pakistan Army
Yasmin Saikia, Arizona State University
Neo-Liberalizing Secularism: Transnational Feminisms & the Politics of Authenticity Dina Siddiqi, BRAC Univ.
Purdah, Piety, and Progress: Competing Notions of the Modern Woman in East Bengal, 1947–71
Elora Shehabuddin, Rice University
Comment: Neilesh Bose, University of North Texas and Monan Ahmed Asif, Columbia University
___________________________________________________________________
 
Small Town Capitalism in Western India:
Discussion of the John Richards Prizewinning Book
Saturday, January 4, 2014: 9:00 AM-11:00 AM Congressional Room B (Omni Shoreham) Lobby Level
Chair: Abigail McGowan, University of Vermont
Neilesh Bose, University of North Texas
Anne Hardgrove, UT San Antonio
Howard Spodek, Temple University
Anand A. Yang, UW Seattle
Comment: Douglas E. Haynes, Dartmouth College
___________________________________________________________________
AHA Session 170:
Muslim Itinerants, Migrants, and Settlers In Early Modern and Modern South Asia
Saturday, January 4, 2014: 11:30 AM-1:30 PM Columbia Hall 4 (Washington Hilton) --- Terrace Level
Chair/Comment: Ali Anooshahr, University of California, Davis
Shaykh Khattu, Sayyid ’Abdullah, and the Process of “Settling” in 15th C Gujarat Jyoti Gulati Balachandran,
Colgate University
The Career(s) and Memory of Neknam Khan in Seventeenth-Century Deccan Subah Dayal, UCLA
Faqirs Running Amok in Malay Port Cities: "Mad" Migrants from Gujarat and the Coromandel Coast
Terenjit Sevea, U Penn
 
AHA Session 197:
Planning (and) the Market: Revisiting Development and State in South Asia Fifty Years after
Nehru’s Passing
Saturday, January 4, 2014: 2:30 PM-4:30 PM Harding Room (Marriott Wardman Park) Mezzanine
Level – Wilson Foyer
Chair/Comment: David Ludden, New York University
Planning for What? The Relationship between Improvement, Development, and Growth before the Nehruvian
State Faisal Iqbal Chaudhry, University of Pennsylvania
The Uses of History in Indian Economic Thinking Prasannan Parthasarathi, Boston College
The Developmental Imagination and India Benjamin Zachariah, University of Heidelberg
Agricultural Development Techno-Science in Nehruvian State Madhumita Saha, Appalachian State
___________________________________________________________________
SAHSA Business Meeting
--‐
ALL WELCOME
Saturday, January 4, 2014: 4:30 PM-5:30 PM Wilson Room C (Marriott Wardman Park)
Mezzanine Level – Wilson Foyer
Presiding:
Anne Hardgrove, University of Texas at San Antonio Neilesh Bose, University of North Texas
___________________________________________________________________
Peepli Live
(film)
Saturday, January 4, 2014: 5:00 PM-7:00 PM Delaware Suite (Marriott Wardman Park)
Lobby Level
Anusha Rizvi, writer and director, Aamir Kahan and Kiran Rao, producers, Mahmood Farooqui, co-director (Aamir
Khan Productions, UTV, 2010) Peepli Live is a feature film that examines the topic of “farmer suicides” in India.
The film tells the story of two brothers who are bankrupt. A local moneylender suggests that one of brothers should commit suicide in order to qualify for a government assistance program set up to pay families only after a suicide. The government subsidy will help save the family farm, but the question is which brother will end his life for the sake of the rest of the family? As the brothers attempt to sort out this conundrum, the local newspaper starts covering the story of the brothers’ dilemma. Through social media, the news item spreads nationally and becomes a media sensation. The resolution of the brothers’ problem is an indictment of the
nature of the culture of late capitalism in a postcolonial context. Further, Rizvi’s film provides an important critique of state policies and the role of new media in India today.
Rajit Mazumder, DePaul University, will introduce the film and lead a discussion afterward.
SAHSA--‐CAH Reception
Saturday, January 4, 2014: 5:30 PM-7:00+ PM
Come share good conversation, light food and drinks. Cash contributions welcome.
LOCATION: Marriot Wardman Park, TBA Suite of Stefan Tenaka
Once Stefan gets the Suite Number, we will send out an email message through SAHSA’s website.
Location will also be announced at the SAHSA Business Meeting and Peepli Live.
______________________________________________________________________
 

Message from the President

Dear SAHSA Members,
 
Greetings from San Antonio!   I am very pleased to be serving as President for the Society for Advancing the History of South Asia for 2013-2014.   The current leadership of SAHSA has shifted southwest over the last year, from New York State and Indiana to Texas:  I am delighted to be joined by Neilesh Bose of the University of North Texas who is currently serving as Vice-President and will be SAHSA’s President for 2014-2015.   Neilesh and I are indebted to all the hard work of the past to get SAHSA off the ground, and are particularly thankful for the mentorship of Past-Presidents Lisa Trivedi and Michael Dodson, who have offered guidance and institutional memory as we pick up the reins.   But we not to leave the north and east completely behind:  We are joined by Faisal Chowdhury of the University of Pennsylvania, who has assumed the position of Secretary-Treasurer.  Welcome Faisal!
           
This past AHA in early January 2013 in New Orleans was a great success for getting South Asia on the AHA Program.  SAHSA’s Annual Business Meeting, Drinks Reception, and SAHSA-CAH (Conference on Asian History) luncheon were all well-attended.   SAHSA sponsored/co-sponsored 9 panels taking place, including our first annual John Richard Book Prize discussion, where we discussed the first John Richards prize-winning book, Farina Mir’s Social Space of Language (California, 2010).   To offer a viewpoint on how South Asia at the AHA has grown, I invite you to read one SAHSA member’s perspective of a past AHA meeting posted below. 
 
For AHA 2014 in Washington DC, we hope to have a SAHSA panel to discuss Douglas Haynes’ Small Town Capitalism in Western India: Artisans, Merchants and the Making of the Informal Economy, 1870-1960 (Cambridge, 2012) which was awarded the John Richards Prize for 2012.   Congratulations to Farina and Doug in their well-deserved prizes!    In addition, along with the SAHSA business meeting at AHA, Neilesh and I hope to host a reception for SAHSA members and friends.  Last year we had a hotel suite, and we are looking into some off-site locations.  We welcome ideas and suggestions of how to best incorporate the DC environs into the weekend.
 
In order to help keep the South Asia history momentum rolling forward, we encourage members to think about contributing a panel for the 2014 program.   AHA offers a variety of formats and welcomes new kinds of sessions into the mix.     Below you will see some details about AHA submissions, along with people seeking panelists, along with a call for papers for an exciting publication that Neilesh is editing on Bangladesh.    
 
Please do not hesitate to get in touch with us to share your ideas, suggestions, and concerns of how SAHSA can serve our needs in the profession.   We’re really happy to be part of such a useful and important group.
 
Warm regards,
 
Anne Hardgrove, President 2013-14,  anne.hardgrove@utsa.edu
Neilesh Bose, Vice-President and President Elect (2014-15) Neilesh.Bose@unt.edu
 
 
______________________________________________________________________________________
 
SAHSA Member Message from Sumit Guha
 
Dear SAHSA colleagues,
 
I was happy to see such a strong turn-out of members in New Orleans even if it led to being forced to make choices between panels.
A decade ago I attended the AHA in San Francisco: the panel I organized was the only South Asia one. Two of four participants were held up by blizzards out East and could not come. There were maybe 5 in the audience. Apart from that Tom Metcalf had a British Empire panel with one S.Asia paper ... Tom and Barbara, Frank Conlon, Anand Yang and John Richards showed up to my recollection.
It was in short a most depressing experience. Last week's sessions show the how successful the efforts of many over the past few years have been. Let us sustain this into the future!
 
With warm good wishes for the new year,
Sumit
*****************
 
 
 
Upcoming Deadlines for AHA and Madison:
 
The American Historical Association is currently accepting proposals for PANELS at their annual conference meeting in Washington DC Jan 2-5, 2014.   AHA’s deadline is February 15, 2013.   Please submit your panel proposals directly to the AHA.   Please note that the AHA no longer accepts single paper submissions.   To submit your proposal, please go to http://www.historians.org/perspectives/issues/2012/1209/Call-for-Proposals-for-the-128th-Annual-Meeting.cfm 
 
The Annual Conference for South Asia in Madison is scheduled for October 17-20, 2013.   Submissions for the Madison Conference are due on April 1, 2013.  SAHSA will have an information meeting at the Madison conference and would love to see everyone!   For more information on the Madison conference, go to http://southasiaconference.wisc.edu
 
______________________________________________________________________________________
 
The following announcements are Calls for Papers for Publication and AHA Panels:
_____________________________________________________________________________________
 
H-ASIA                         Jan 12 2013
 
Seeking Participants for a panel at AHA' 14 on Nehruvian India
*********************************************
From: Madhumita Saha <madhumeetasaha@gmail.com>
 
Dear Colleagues in South Asian History,
 
Dr. Faisal Chowdhury and I are planning a panel, which would like to focus on different aspects of planning - its history, politics and impact – in Nehruvian India. The panel is tentatively titled,  "Planning (and) the Market: Revisiting Development and State in South Asia 50 Years afterNehru's Passing."
 
We will like to concentrate broadly on the history of ideas; planning and development; the history of 60's era development state policies vs. the gradual turn toward the clamor for more market-oriented policies of the present; the history of the 'market' and its dependence on the state; the use of techno-science in development etc. We are open to new suggestions too.
 
The timeline being the middle of February, we would appreciate if you are interested to contact us immediately.
 
You can email us at: saham@appstate.edu; faisalc@sas.upenn.edu    Many thanks,    Madhumita & Faisal    --Dr. Madhumita Saha <http://www.public.iastate.edu/~msaha/>

 

 
Seeking Co-Panelists for AHA 2014
 
My current project relates to my two previous books, analyzing post-Mutiny/early nationalist actions, issues, attitudes, muddles. I can shape my paper to fit any of several themes – for instance:
(1) “The Accidental Viceroy.”  A political appointee who admitted he knew nothing about India and managed to alienate nearly everyone during his four years.  (2) “Cutting a Friend to Pieces.” Sir Salar Jung staked his career on the friendship and cooperation of the British, but received only rejections and insults in return. (3) “Disappearing Hyderabad.” Never conquered or annexed, just bound, desiccated, and left to wither and die in the hot sun of nationalism.
 
Cordially,         Ed Hirschmann                        410-542-2338     ehirschmann@verizon.net

 

 
From H-Asia
 
CFP Pakistaniaat, A Journal of Pakistan Studies Special Issue on The  Aesthetics and Limits of Historical Memory: Contemporary Perspectives on  Bangladesh
*******************************************
From: Bose, Neilesh <Neilesh.Bose@unt.edu>
 
CFP: Pakistaniaat: A Journal of Pakistan Studies
 
Special Issue on The Aesthetics and Limits of Historical Memory:
Contemporary Perspectives on Bangladesh
 
Guest Editor: Neilesh Bose, University of North Texas
 
Under the guest editorship of Dr. Neilesh Bose, Pakistaniaat welcomes
submissions for its December 2013 edition with a focus on East Bengal, East
Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Given the recent reflections on history of the
1971 war in historical literature and film, this special issue aims to
interrogate the state of debate regarding historical legacies, the arts and
aesthetic representations, and silences and voices within the contemporary
age. This special edition builds upon the 2010 issue about the 1971
Indo-Pakistan war by focusing on the contemporary debates about
historiography, historical memory, literary criticism, and film. Given the
emergence in 2011 of Rubaiyat Hossein’s film Meher Jaan, Sarmila Bose’s
Dead Reckoning: Memories of the 1971 Bangladesh War, and Yasmin Saikia’s
Women, War, and the Making of Bangladesh: Remembering 1971, the field now
includes vigorous debates about memorialization, historic accuracy,
nationalism, violence, women’s roles in the conflicts, relations between
East and West Pakistan in the years leading up to the 1971 war. This new
vista of reflection about East Bengal, East Pakistan, and Bangladesh has
also entered the larger field of the history and culture of contemporary
Pakistan.  The editorial staff welcomes creative writing (poetry and
prose), book review essays, scholarly articles featuring new research, and
translations of original texts about any of these topics.
 
For submission guidelines and submission, please visit
http://www.pakistaniaat.org/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions. Please
contact the guest editor, Dr. Neilesh Bose, neilesh.bose@unt.edu, with
questions and concerns.
 
Deadline for submissions is June 1, 2013.
 
Pakistaniaat is a refereed, multidisciplinary, and open access academic
journal offering a forum for scholarly and creative engagement with various
aspects of Pakistani history, culture, literature, and politics. Housed in
the English Department of the University of North Texas, Pakistaniaat is a
sponsored journal of the American Institute of Pakistan Studies. Available
online as well as in print, Pakistaniaat publishes three issues per year.
 
About the Guest Editor:
Dr. Neilesh Bose is currently Assistant Professor of History at the
University of North Texas and Vice President of the Society for Advancing
the History of South Asia. Research interests include late colonial and
post-colonial India and Pakistan, decolonization, cultural and intellectual
history, modern Bengal, Islam in South Asia, popular culture, and South
Asian diasporas. Recent research concerning these topics has been published
in South Asian Popular Culture, South Asia Research, and is forthcoming in
Modern Asian Studies. He is guest editing a special edition of South Asian
History and Culture regarding South Asian Islam and his forthcoming book
about late colonial and early post-colonial Bengal is entitled Recasting
the Region: Language, Culture, and Islam in Colonial Bengal.